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Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV), Sacral

Herpes simplex infection of the lower back and buttocks—also called sacral herpes simplex or genital herpes—is a common recurrent skin condition associated with infection by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). HSV infection usually appears as small blisters or sores around the mouth, nose, genitals, buttocks, and lower back, though infections can develop almost anywhere on the skin. Furthermore, these tender sores may come back periodically in the same sites.Infections with the herpes simplex virus are very contagious and are spread by direct contact with the skin lesions. There are 2 types of HSV: Type 1 and Type 2. HSV Type 1 (HSV-1) infections usually occur around the mouth, lips, nose, or face, while HSV Type 2 (HSV-2) infections usually involve the genitals, lower back, or buttocks. However, HSV-1 can sometimes cause infections in the genitals or buttocks, while HSV-2 can occasionally cause infections around the mouth, lips, nose, or face.Both types of herpes simplex virus produce 2 kinds of infections: primary and recurrent. Because it so contagious, HSV causes a primary infection in most people who are exposed to the virus. However, only about 20% of people who are infected with HSV actually develop visible blisters or sores. Appearing 2–12 days after a person's first exposure to HSV, the sores of a primary infection last about 1–3 weeks. These sores heal completely, rarely leaving a scar. Nevertheless, the virus remains in the body, hibernating in nerve cells.Certain triggers can cause the hibernating (latent) virus to wake up, become active, and travel back to the skin. These recurrent herpes simplex virus infections may develop frequently (every few weeks), or they may never develop. Recurrent infections tend to be milder than primary infections and generally occur in the same location as the primary infection.HSV-2 infections are transmitted sexually or from a mother's genital tract to her newborn baby. HSV-2 is often spread through direct skin-to-skin contact with active lesions on another person. However, people who have herpes simplex virus infections may be contagious even when they do not have any skin lesions, which is called asymptomatic shedding.Because sacral HSV is not located in the groin area, people may not realize that they have a form of genital herpes. In fact, they may think that they have a recurrent skin condition such as shingles, a yeast infection, or an allergic reaction. However, sacral herpes is considered to be a form of genital herpes.

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV), Orofacial

Orofacial herpes simplex virus is the medical name for herpes simplex infection of the mouth and face, also known as cold sores or fever blisters. These are common, contagious sores that usually occur on the inner and outer lips but can also be spread to the fingers and other body parts. There are 2 major strains of herpes simplex virus (HSV): herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). In general, cold sores and fever blisters are caused by HSV-1, and genital herpes is caused by HSV-2. HSV-1 is not a sexually transmitted disease, though HSV-2 is. There is no cure for either strain of the virus, and once a person is infected, he/she is contagious for life.Fever blisters and cold sores look like small open sores, usually appearing on the corners of the mouth or inside the lips. They are often painful when the sores are open, and before they appear, some people experience a tingling sensation that indicates that the cold sore is on its way. Once a person has a cold sore at one location, he/she is more likely to get another in the same location at another time. Cold sores and fever blisters can be spread by kissing or sharing intimate objects such as toothbrushes, lip balms, utensils, or towels.Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 are very contagious. However, only about 20% of people exposed to either virus will experience the associated sores. This means that the majority of people carrying the virus do not know it. For this reason, it is important to protect yourself by knowing your sexual partners and by avoiding contact with others' intimate items. There is no cure for either strain of HSV. People who struggle with frequent outbreaks of sores often learn specific triggers that bring the sores on and can take medicines or use treatments to help lessen the attacks.

Herpetic Whitlow

Herpetic whitlow—also called digital herpes simplex, finger herpes, or hand herpes—is a painful viral infection occurring on the fingers or around the fingernails. Herpetic whitlow is caused by infection with the herpes simplex virus (HSV).Infections with HSV are very contagious and are easily spread by direct contact with infected skin lesions. HSV infection usually appears as small blisters or sores around the mouth, nose, genitals, and buttocks, though infections can develop almost anywhere on the skin. Furthermore, these tender sores may recur periodically in the same sites.There are 2 types of HSV: herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). HSV-1 infections usually occur around the mouth, lips, nose, or face, while HSV-2 infections usually involve the genitals or buttocks. However, HSV-1 can sometimes cause infections in the genitals or buttocks, while HSV-2 can occasionally cause infections around the mouth, lips, nose, or face.Both types of HSV produce 2 kinds of infections: primary and recurrent. Because it is so contagious, the herpes simplex virus causes a primary infection in most people who are exposed to the virus. However, only about 20% of people who have a primary infection with the herpes simplex virus actually develop visible blisters or sores. Appearing 2–20 days after a person's first exposure to HSV, the sores of a primary infection last about 1–3 weeks. These sores heal completely, rarely leaving a scar. Nevertheless, the virus remains in the body, hibernating in nerve cells.Certain triggers can cause the hibernating (latent) virus to wake up, become active, and travel back to the skin. These recurrent herpes simplex virus infections may develop frequently (every few weeks), or they may never develop. Recurrent infections tend to be milder than primary infections and generally occur in the same location as the primary infection.People develop herpetic whitlow when they come into contact with areas already infected with HSV, either on their own bodies or on someone else's body. Usually, there is a break in the skin, especially a torn cuticle at the base of the fingernail, which allows the virus to enter the finger tissue and establish an infection. HSV-1 causes approximately 60% of herpetic whitlow infections, while HSV-2 causes the remaining 40%.

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