Results from Search: "outdoors"

Results in Skin Conditions:

Tick Bites, First Aid

Ticks are 8-legged creatures (arachnids) that live in wooded and grassy areas. Ticks attach themselves to a human host as the person brushes past leaves, grass, etc – ticks do not jump or fall on a person. Once on a person, ticks move to a warm and moist location (eg, armpit, groin, back of the knee, hairline), where they burrow into the host's skin and feed off their blood.While most ticks are harmless, some carry disease and may transmit illness (eg, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colorado tick fever) to their host. Certain ticks can even inject venom that causes temporary paralysis in their host (called tick paralysis).First Aid GuideTo remove an embedded tick: Wash your hands. Clean tweezers by boiling them or by pouring antiseptic solution (eg, isopropyl alcohol) over them. With tweezers, grasp the tick as close to its head or mouth as possible, and pull it straight out with a slow and steady motion. Be careful not to leave the head embedded in the skin, and make sure all parts of the tick are completely removed. Note: Be sure to not twist the tick body as you pull it out. Wash the area completely with soap and water.After the tick has been completely removed, watch for approximately the next few weeks for signs of infection or illness, particularly if the tick was likely attached for over 24 hours. (See When To Seek Medical Care.)PreventionThe most important thing to consider regarding ticks is that prevention of tick bites is key. While in wooded areas, tall grass, or brush, consider doing the following: Wear long pants and long sleeves. Wear your socks over the outside of your pant legs. Tuck your shirt into your pants. Wear light-colored clothes so that ticks can easily be spotted. Spray your clothes and exposed skin with insect repellant. Frequently check your clothes and skin for ticks.It is important to remove a tick within 24 hours, if possible. Once home, remove your clothes and thoroughly inspect all skin surface areas. Don't forget your scalp! As ticks can be quite small, carefully evaluate all black or brown spots on the skin.

Heat Cramps, First Aid

Heat cramps are a form of heat illness. Heat illness occurs when a person's core body temperature rises above a safe level of the body's internal temperature range. Heat cramps are the earliest sign of heat illness. Loss of salt in the body due to excessive perspiring causes the painful, involuntary muscle spasms. If the person does not take precautions to cool off and rehydrate at this point, more severe stages of heat illness will occur in a rapid progression, resulting in a potentially life-threatening situation.See the Heat Exhaustion or Heatstroke topics via the Disease List if later stages of heat illness are suspected.First Aid GuideUse a combination of the following measures, depending on the circumstances and means available: Have the person rest in a shaded area or cool or air-conditioned building, room, or car. Give the person an electrolyte beverage, such as Gatorade® or Pedialyte®, or water if not available. Note: You can make a salted drink by adding 1 teaspoon of salt to one quart of water. Pour water over the person or spray with a hose. Note: Do not do this if the person is disoriented. Wrap the person in wet cloth, and position a fan toward him/her. Evaporation of water on the skin aids in cooling. Apply cold compresses (eg, to neck, armpits, groin). Attempt to relax the cramped muscles by massaging them gently but firmly. If possible, take the person's temperature while starting cooling measures and continue to check his/her temperature every few minutes. Once it has gone down to 100° F, you can discontinue cooling measures but continue to check the person's temperature every 30 minutes for 3–4 hours.

Heatstroke, First Aid

Heatstroke, also known as sunstroke, is a form of heat illness. Heat illness occurs when a person's core body temperature rises above a safe level of the body's internal temperature range. Heat cramps are the earliest sign of heat illness. If precautions to cool off and rehydrate at this point are not made, the more severe stage of heat illness, heat exhaustion, can occur in a rapid progression, resulting in a potentially life-threatening situation. The most severe form of heat illness is heatstroke, which may result in shock, brain damage, or death.See the Heat Cramps or Heat Exhaustion texts via the Disease List for information specific to the earlier stages of heat illness.First Aid GuideWhen heatstroke is suspected, seek emergency medical care immediately. While awaiting emergency medical services, try to cool the person as described below.Use a combination of the following measures depending on the circumstances and means available:Have the person rest, legs slightly elevated, in a shaded area or cool or air-conditioned building, room, or car. Remove or loosen the person's clothes. Give the person an electrolyte drink, such as Gatorade® or Pedialyte®, or water if not available. Note: You can make a salted drink by adding 1 teaspoon of salt to one quart of water. Do not give beverages that contain caffeine or alcohol. Wrap the person in wet cloth, and position a fan toward him/her. Evaporation of water on the skin aids in cooling. Apply cold compresses (eg, to neck, armpits, groin).

Heat Exhaustion, First Aid

Heat exhaustion is the moderate form of heat illness. Heat illness occurs when a person's core body temperature rises above a safe level of the body's internal temperature range. Heat cramps are the earliest sign of heat illness. If precautions to cool off and rehydrate at this point are not made, the more severe stage of heat illness, heat exhaustion, can occur in a rapid progression. The progression from the early stage of heat illness to heat exhaustion and subsequently to heatstroke can be very quick and can result in a potentially life-threatening situation.See the Heat Cramps or Heatstroke texts via the Disease List for information specific to the other stages of heat illness.First Aid GuideUse a combination of the following measures depending on the circumstances and means available:Have the person rest, legs slightly elevated, in a shaded area or cool or air-conditioned building, room, or car. Remove or loosen the person's clothes. Give the person an electrolyte drink, such as Gatorade® or Pedialyte®, or water if not available. Do not give beverages that contain caffeine or alcohol. Note: You can make a salted drink by adding 1 teaspoon of salt to one quart of water. Pour water over the person or spray with a hose. Note: Do not do this if the person is disoriented. Wrap the person in wet cloth, and position a fan toward him/her. Evaporation of water on the skin aids in cooling. Apply cold compresses (eg, to neck, armpits, groin).If possible, take the person's temperature while starting cooling measures and continue to check the temperature every few minutes. Once it has gone down to 100° F, you can discontinue cooling measures, but continue to check the person's temperature every 30 minutes for 3–4 hours to ensure it stays down.

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